IRIS MURDOCH. THE SANDCASTLE1

EXERCISES

Chapters I-II

I. Translate into Russian a passage on pp. 20-21 ("Nan!" he said ... They all went in to dinner.") and a passage on p. 22 ("Моr, who was anxious ... it's time for coffee.").

II. Find in the text English equivalents for the following words and phrases. Learn them and use when giving a summary:

даром, бесплатно; школа, где учатся и живут ученики; вспышка кори; подготовительная школа; держать вступительные экзамены в колледж; директор школы; он уступал первым; выглядеть смешным; заниматься немецким; растраченные способности; шестой класс, изучающий гуманитарные науки; шестой класс, изучающий естественные науки; помощник (заместитель) директора школы; ей никогда не нравился Демойт; учитель рисования; пейзаж

III. The author uses a number of historical allusions. Find them in the text and say what you know about them:

Cambridge (p. 6); the Labour party (p. 11); a Tory (p. 15); Westminster (p. 16)

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IV. Explain what is meant by:

1. "As for Evvy's judgement, he casts down his eyes like a milkmaid if he meets a member of the other sex." (p. 8) 2. It was all part of the pattern. (p.. 12) 3. The latter often reflected that if one were to have him for an enemy Demoyte would present a very unpleasant aspect indeed. (p. 14) 4. "Моr, you are only fit to be a country school-master." (p. 19) 5. "Mr. Mor's better half is still to come." (p. 20) 6. In any conflict with the outside world Nan was invariably an efficient ally. (p. 20) 7. "Her sense of vocation is like a steam hammer." (p. 21) 8. "He's got some stuff inside him." (p. 22) 9. Demoyte was a connoisseur of books. (p. 22)

V. Comment on what the characters say (or think):

1. (Nan) "Someone's got to take some responsibility for what the children do." (p. 6) 2. (Nan) "You live in a dream world, Bill. Neither-of your children are clever, and you've already caused them both enough unhappiness by pretending that they are." (p. 9) 3. (Nan) "Men of his generation have such romantic ideas about female emancipation." (p. 10) 4. (Nan) "But anyhow quite apart from the money, you haven't the personality to be a public man." (p. 11) 5. The training of character was what was nearest to Evvy's heart - and performance in Latin prose he regarded a secondary matter. (p. 15)

VI. Say what expressive means are used by the author and comment on their stylistic value:

1. "She has some pathetically comic name." (p. 7) 2. "He's a morbid old man." (p. 8) 3. "I hate to see you as poor Evvy's henchman." (p. 16) 4. She was a stout powerful middle-aged woman with a face like a lion and a foot like a rhino, (p. 17) 5. Demoyte's heavy sardonic mouth did not follow the usual conventions about smiling. (p. 21) 6. She looked, Моr thought, like some small and brilliantly plumaged bird. (p. 23) 7. After the brilliance of the house the garden was strange, pregnant with trees and bushes ... (p. 24) 8. Miss Carter went up the steps like a bird ... (p. 25)

VII. Answer the following questions and motivate your answers:

1. What kind of relations existed between Mor and Nan? 2. What made Nan say that Mor lived in a dream world and had no personality to be a public man? 3. Do you think Mor was really to blame for Nan's frustrated gifts? 4. Why was Mor always the one who crawled back? 5. Why did his authority in the school stand high? 6. Who was Mr. Demoyte and why did Mor admire him? 7. What was it that Demoyte cared about that made him difficult to live with? 8. Why was Demoyte in favour of Tim Burke's plan to make Mor .a Labour Candidate? 9. Why didn't Nan and Demoyte like one another? 10. How did Mor and Rain meet? 11. Rain said that Evvy seemed a man with no malice in him and his face was fresh and gentle while Nan said he was a fool. Who of them was right? 12. What was the difference between Demoyte and

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Mor concerning books? Which is your own habit? 13. How does the fact that Nan thought that flowers were rather messy and insanitary things characterize her? 14. What kind of shock had Mor experienced that he found it difficulf to interpret? 15. Why did Nan say that though Rain took herself seriously she was really a little clown?

VII. Give a summary of chapters III-V.

IX. Write a one-page precis of chapters I-V.

Chapters VI-VII

I. Translate Into Russian a passage on p. 41 ("He felt again that sad guilty feeling " ... at this evening's efforts.") and a passage on pp. 56-57 ("As you know ... A sudden silence followed.").

II. Find In the text English equivalents for the following words and phrases. Learn them and use when giving a summary:

обязанность; отсутствие по болезни; сохранять порядок (в классе); площадка для игр; кабинет физики; спортзал; канат (спорт); брусья (спорт); конь (спорт); учитель физвоспитания; наблюдать; делать что-л. из приличия; полуграмотный; сделать глупость; говорить о делах (о работе); карандашный набросок; взглянуть украдкой; подвезти; пёстрая косынка

III. The author uses a number of historical allusions. Find them in the text and say what you know about them:

Byzantine styles (p. 37); " ... and if I could dissolve a pearl in it I would!" (p. 48); the French impressionists (p. 52); Dr. Johnson (p. 53); painting by Rembrandt, by Goya, by Tintoretto (p, 57).

IV. Explain what is meant by:

1. ... trying to invest his voice with a tone of injured innocence. (p. 28) 2. He wondered if it was Miss Carter's own voice or the voice of her father. (p. 34) 3. ... she had a sense of vocation like a steam hammer. (p. 34) 4. "Come on, the coast's clear!" (p-. 37) 5: In the chaste scene she looked as dusky as a chimney-sweeper's boy. (p. 39) 6. ... he suddenly realized that he had been ... in the position of the coy maiden who has made up her mind but who puts up a show of resistance merely in order to be persuaded. (p. 47)

V. Comment on what-the characters say or think:

1. Mor knew that keeping order was a gift of nature ... (p. 27) 2. Donald's reading, such as it was, seemed to consist mainly of Three Men in a Boat ... (p. 31) 3. (Rain) "As you will realize, painting a portrait is not just a matter of sitting down and painting what you see." (p. 34) 4, (Mor) How well he knew that many teachers, including some who got high reputation ... contented themselves with putting up a show, often a brilliant one, in front af those who were to be instructed ... Whereas the real teacher cares only for one thing, that the matter should be understood. (p. 41) 5. (Mor) Nothing is more educational, in the end, than the mode of being of other people. (p. 50) 6. (Mor) Doubtless

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such a character ought not to. be in a position of power. (p. 50) 7. (Bledyard) "The great painter is he who is humble enough in the presence of the object to attempt merely, to show what the object is like. But this merely, in painting, is everything." (p. 56) 8. (Rain) "Our paintings are a judgement upon ourselves. I know in what way, and how deplorably, my own paintings show what I am." (p. 57)

VI. Say what expressive means are used by the author and comment on their stylistic value:

1. She was slim enough: but all the same she looked in those garments, Mor thought, rather like a school child dressed to impersonate a Paris street boy. (p. 33) 2. "It shall be a secret between us," said Miss Carter. (p. 3G) 3. She looked like a child's picture herself, extremely gay and simple. (p. 37) 4. He checked a comment, and deliberately withdrew his attention from her as from a child that shows off. (p. 39) 5. ... his words of wisdom may be digested together with a pint of mild and bitter. (p. 42) 6. ... Mor and Nan had to some extent taken Tim, who was a bachelor, under their wing. (p. 43) 7. The wooden shutters which covered the shop windows at night made it quite dark now within and in the dim light of the lamp it looked like some treasure cave or alchemist's den. (p. 45) 8. "Yes," said Miss Carter, "but a melancholy sea as I remember it." (p. 53)

VII. Answer the following questions and motivate your answers:

1. Do you think a piece of prepared translation from Latin that Mor had chosen was really suitable for a class of boys? 2. How do you account for the strained relations between Mor and his son Donald? 3. What kind of books did Donald usually read? 4. Rain really took art seriously, didn't she? 5. Why did Dernoyte not only wear a grey lounge suit in Rain's presence, but aiso pretend that he wrote poetry? 6. Why did Rain like children's art? 7. Why did she behave so strangely in Bledyard's room? 8. What made Mor think that Nan was not on easy terms with Tim Burke? 9. What do you think of Tim Burke? 10. Why did the behaviour of Nan and Don in Tim's shop make Mor feel uneasy? 11. Why did Mor take the ear-rings in the end? 12. Why was it that Mor could hardly summon up any affection for poor Evvy who was so gentle and unselfish and felt deep love and tenderness for Demoyte, who was so much the reverse? 13. Do you think Bledyard's conception of painting and portrait painting in particular right? 14. Did Rain Carter share Bledyard's views on painting? 15. Why did Mor think Bledyard impudent?

VIII. Give a summary of chapters III-V.

IX. Write a one-page precis of chapters III-V.

Chapters VI-VII

I. Translate into Russian a passage on pp. 59-60 ("The Riley turned on ... if he upset you!") and a passage on pp. 86-87 ("Demoyte looked at him critically ... Don't cross me here.").

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II. Find In the text English equivalents for the following words and phrases. Learn them and use when giving a summary:

чувствовать себя виноватым; натянутая атмосфера; серьезно относиться к искусству; осуществить план; мольберт; краски и кисти; фон; оттенок; оставить все, как есть; допустить бестактность; доказательство, улики; тем хуже для вас; избиратели; напугать

III. The author uses a number of historical allusions. Find them in the text and say what you know of them:

Burne-Jones (p. 76); Romney (p. 76); Rubens (p. 81); Oxford (p. 84)

IV. Explain what is meant by:

1. He felt that this last exchange had broken some barrier between himself and Miss Carter, and he found himself now more at ease in her presence. (p. 63) 2. He owed her a service. (p. 63) 3. It had made something very simple and trivial into something that appeared important. (p. 66) 4. But somehow it had not occurred to him, so completely insulated had he been by the strange atmosphere of that other world. (p. 71) 5. Tim's look expressed curiosity, diffidence and affection. Mor's look expressed affection, exasperation, and remorse. (p. 72) 6. Even with a county grant, it'll cost a packet to put Donald through Cambridge. (p. 86) 7. ... it occurred to Mor that in a way he was sacrificing Felicity's future to his own. (p. 87)

V. Comment on what the characters say or think:

1. (Rain) I take my art very seriously. (p. 60) 2. (Mor) But apologies aren't much use. (p. 67) 3. (Mor) "I'm afraid your Irish imagination has carried you away a bit, Tim." (p. 72) 4. (Rain's father) "Don't forget that a portrait must have depth, mass, and decorative qualities. Don't be so fascinated by the head, or by the space, that you forget that a canvas is also a flat surface with edges which touch the frame." (p. 74) 5. (Rain) "Artists do paint themselves in their sitters." (p. 76) 6. "With an M. P.'s salary," said Demoyte doggedly, "you can send Felicity to college." (p. 87)

VI. Say what expressive means are used by the author and comment on their stylistic value:

1. "To drive a car along a path like this," said Miss Carter almost in a whisper, "is like sailing a boat along a street. It is an enchantment." (p. 64) 2. As he felt the big car purring quietly along under his control Mor felt like a king. (p. 65) 3. If he was to take refuge in the truth, and indeed that was his possible refuge, it had better be the whole truth. (p. 66) 4. Mor saw it rise above him like a rearing animal. (p. 68) 5. She spoke as if it were a wounded animal. (p. 70) 6. With her short dark hair and the strong dusky red of her cheeks she looked like Pierrot, and had, it suddenly seemed to Mor, something of his grotesque melancholy. (p. 81) 7. Mor sat perfectly still, conscious on the one side of the gentle intent glances of Miss Carter, and on the other of the sardonic covertly

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amused attention of Demoyte. (p. 83) 8. He felt like a man with one cheek exposed to the fragrant breezes of the spring, while upon the other is let loose an autumnal shower of chilling rain. (p. 83) 9. She's rather like a clown or a performing dog. (p. 85). 10. "You'll get out of this hole, away from pious Evvy and dreary Prewett, and dotty Bledyard ... " (p. 86) 11. "You're as timid as a water-snail ... " (p. 87)

VII. Answer the following questions and motivate your answers:

1. Did Bledyard really have a characteristic of mad people, as Rain had put it? 2. What made Mor ignore conventions and go for a ride with Rain? 3. Why didn't Mor tell Nan the truth that he was out with Rain in her car? 4. Do you think that it was Tim's Irish imagination that male him conceal the truth from Nan? 5. Why did Tim's interference complicate things for Mor? 6. What kind of note did Mor write Rain and why did he do it? 7. What showed that Demoyte encouraged Rain's and Mor's growing affection towards each other? 8. Was Mor right when he said that Demoyte had a rather exaggerated view on the benefits of education? 9. Was Mor really going to be an M. P.? 10. Why was Demoyte so insistent that Mor should accept his money to be able to send Felicity to college? 11. Was it really only an extra financial risk that made Nan so stubbornly opposed to Mor's ambition to be an M. P.? 12. What made Mor see the beauty of the night and feel an extreme lightness when he left Demoyte's house?

VIII. Give a summary of chapters VI-VII.

IX. Write a one-page precis of chapters VI-VII.

Chapters VIII-X

I. Translate into Russian a passage on p. 104 ("On the previous day ... with unmixed delight.") and a passage on pp. 118-119 ("The picture was at the far end of the room ... returned to a scrutiny of the picture.").

II. Find in the text English equivalents for the following words and phrases. Learn them and use when giving a summary:

возьми себя в руки; наобум; во весь рост; понять, раскусить; сглазить; задумать, затеять; придумать предлогу перевернуть все вверх дном; читать (его) мысли; ценный; превзойти ожидания

III. The author uses a number of historical allusions. Find them and say whatyou know about them:

Boadicea (p. 94); Gainsborough (p. 102); the Royal Festival Hall. (p. 105); Lucifer (p. 109)

IV. Explain what is meant by:

1. "He didn't look as if he was fed up either." (p. 95) 2. "If Prewett passes, we're both for the high jump." (p. 97) 3. She suspected that Donald had other ideas, and felt a sudden feminine wish to protect Miss Carter against his depredations. (p. 100) 4. Her deep voice expressed incredulity and disgust. (p. 102) 5. She had used her most exasperating

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technique. (p. 104) 6. " and he feared his children especially when they brought gifts. (p. 105) 7. Mor suddenly felt certain that Bledyard must be reading his mind. (p.-109) 8. He could not afford, at this time in the summer term, to have two crises on his hands at once. (p. 116) 9. "But this is a painting, Miss Carter." (p. 119) 10. He knew that he had done wrong. (p. 121)

V. Comment on what the characters say or think:

1. "You can't behave anyhow to people and expect them to love you just the samel" said Nan to Felicity. "That's just what I do expect," said Felicity ... (p. 90) 2. In order to preserve these masterpieces for posterity it was the duty of each succeeding incumbent, enforced in case of need by the prefects of Prewett's house, to pin up pictures in the appropriate spots and see that they stayed in place. (p. 94) 3. Mor got a bitter, and he knew very unworthy satisfaction out of imagining Nan's fury when she found that he really meant for once to take what he wanted. (p. 104) 4. But Donald always looked more grown-up in the context of something that he could do well. A little more confidence would do him a lot of good. (p. 116) 5. "You can't give an expensive thing like that to the boy!" (p. 117) 6. "You have made your picture too beautiful. The observation of character is very well. But this is a painting, Miss Carter." (p. 119)

VI. Say what expressive means are used by the author and comment on their stylistic value:

1. "Oh, stop it, dear," said Nan, "do stop it ... " (p. 91) 2. In order to preserve these masterpieces for posterity ... (p. 94) 3. He sprang out of the door like a small panther ... (p. 95) 4. In the course of these raids, a number of highly cherished prizes had been taken, including some underpants of Mr. Prewett, Mr. Hensman's braces, and an elegant sponge-bag belonging to Mr. Everard. ... (p. 97) 5. "Bill, you know our charming little dears as well as I do." (p. 105) 6. He dragged his bicycle out, manhandling it as if it were a savage animal. (p. 107) 7, Bledyard looked into Mor's face, still smiling his infuriating smile. (p. 110) 8. Mor had gone to bed that night in a state of dazed and blissful happiness ... .(p. 113) 9. ... and Miss Handforth who was holding a tea-pot as if it were a hand grenade. (p. 118) 10. He looked into her face, and was astonished to see what an intense almost wild expression was in her eyes. (p. 120).

VII. Answer the following questions and motivate your answers:

1. Why couldn't Felicity just go into school and look for Donald there, but had to squeeze through the slat in the school fence? 2. Did Felicity hate Jimmy Carde only because she could never make him out? 3. What was Felicity ready to do to dissuade Don from climbing the tower? 4. Why was Donald so set upon climbing the tower? 5. Why did Miss Handforth look at Mor's children with incredulity and disgust? 6. What do you think of the children's raids and their highly cherished prizes? 7. What proves that Felicity was not so limited as she

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looked? 8. What was it about his wife that always astonished Mor and reduced him to almost speechless anger whenever he talked to her about his intentions? 9. Why was Mor obscurely aware of the future suddenly radiant with hope and possibility when he was seeing. Nan off? 10. What did he suddenly realize after the train with Nan and Felicity had disappeared? 11. Why had Mor gone to bed that night in a state of dazed and blissful happiness and on the following morning woken up in despair? 12. Why did Rain's arrival at the cricket field create a stir? 13. Why did Tim always make some presents, sometimes valuable, to Mor's wife and son? 14. Why did Mor feel compassion for Demoyte when he saw his picture for the first time? 15. Did Bledyard appreciate or criticize Rain's picture? 16. Do you think Mor had done wrong by inviting Rain to his house in his wife's absence?

VIII. Give a summary of chapters VIII-X.

IX. Write a one-page precis of chapters VIII-X.

Chapters XI-XIV

I. Translate into Russian a passage on pp. 141-142 ("Mor had felt extreme relief ... His anger blazed up, terminating the reverie.") and a passage on p. 148 ("Since her return to Dorset ... she did not care to know.").

II. Find in the text English equivalents for the following words and phrases. Learn them and use them when giving a summary:

междугородный телефонный разговор; подойти к телефону; здравый смысл; удивить, поразить; скрыть огорчение от; дело зашло далеко; растеряться, не знать, что делать; теперь, когда ...; держать на расстоянии, не подпускать близко к себе; делать отчаянные попытки; устроить сцену, скандал; доверять; держать в поле зрения, не спускать глаз; присутствовать на церемонии; вопреки условностям

III. Explain what is meant by:

1. The world had exploded-into a lot of little senseless pieces. (p. 131) 2. In that instant she saw him close, mysterious, other than herself, full to the brim of his own particular history. (p. 134) 3. In the privacy and difference of his past, ... there lay for her a promise of consolation and a long solace of discovery. (p. 134) 4. She felt with a sense of relief her protective power over him. (p. 137) 5. "Well, you know she is a child." (p. 144) 6. "I know it's Sunday, Bledyard," said Mor, "but one sermon is enough." (p. 145) 7. Something in the seriousness of Bledyard's manner, combined with the extremity in which he now continuously felt himself to be, made him engage the discussion on Bledyard's own terms. (p. 145) 8. The point is not to lament or cry out mea maxima culpa, but rather to do the thing that is right." (p. 145) 9. What he said sounded empty and trivial in his own ears. (p. 145) 10. "You live in a world of imagined things." (p. 146)

IV. Comment on what the characters say or think:

1. Nan, who did not think that children should have secrets from their parents, had lifted the receiver ... ю(p. 128) 2. The idea of confiding

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in one of her women friends, such as Mrs Prewett, was inconceivable. (p. 131) 3. "And anyway you are the stronger one. Yes," he said, "you are the strong one, you know." (p. 132) 4. He was able, a little, to explain how in the long years Nan had frustrated him, breaking within him piece by piece the structure of his own desires. (p. 141) 5. "You are deeply bound to your wife and to your children ... But if you break these bonds you destroy a part of the world." (p. 145) 6. "Happiness?" said Bledyard, making a fase of noncomprehension, "What has happiness got to do with it? Do you imagine that you, or. anyone, has some sort of right to happiness? That idea is a poor guide." (p. 145) 7. "There is such a thing as respect for reality." (p. 146) 8. "A painter can only paint what he is. You will prevent her from being a great painter." (p. 147)

V. Say what expressive means are used by the author and comment on their stylistic value:

1. It was like catching a thief. (p. 122) 2. He felt as if Nan would launch herself upon him like a tiger as soon as he let her in. (p. 127) 3. Presumably this soft cat-like nature must appeal to some desire to be soothed and comforted which existed in all men ... (p. 129) 4. ... she could hear his steps pursuing her in the gloomy stillness ... (p. 130) 5. The objects in the yard were present- to her with an appalling precision. (p. 153) 6. She wanted, very much she wanted to know him now ... (p. 134) 7. ... she was determined that it was she who would talk and not Bill. (p. 135) 8. "Do you seriously imagine that you could make anything out of a love affair with an attractive, flighty little gipsy with a French upbringing who might be your daughter?" (p. 138) 9. But she went on to say that there was no issue. There was, after all, no is-suei Mor had said in his heart, there must be an issue. (p. 141) 10. ... the anger which was the tremendous counterpart of so long and so minute an oppression ... (p. 141). 11. The prospect of doing this, ... was like the prospect of cutting off his own arm at the shoulder with a blunt knife. (p. 143) 12. There was an immediate silence. A sudden and startling stillness. (p.. 147) -13. The moon had just risen, with a big pale melancholy pock-marked face. (p. 147)

VI. Answer the following questions and motivate your answers:

1. Why was it that though Mor had no expectation of joy from Rain's coming and at the same time he was in agony lest she should not come? 2. Why did Rafn make up her mind not to come to Mor's house and to leave him a letter instead? 3. Do you think it proper of Rain to stay for the night in Mor's house? Was it her intention or did Mor urge her to stay? 4. Who of the three (Mor, Rain, Nan) was the calmest when Nan entered the room? 5. How did Nan finji out something about Mor and Rain that made her return? 6. Why did Nan go to Tim Burke and not to any of her women friends after she had found Mor and Rain in her house? 7. Do you think Tim Burke really loved her? 8. Why did she make up her mind that it was she who would do the talking and not Bill? 9. What reasons did Nan give to convince Mor - that there was nothing for him but give up Rain? 10. Why did Nan go back to Dorset

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instead of remaining with her husband? Was it because she was indifferent? 11. Why did Mor stop loving his wife? 12. What do you think was the only issue for Rain and Mor? 13. Why did Bledyard interfere, urging Mor to stop seeing Rain? What reasons did he give? 14. Why was Nan deeply hurt by Tim's betrayal? 15. Was she as sure as before that her instructions would be carried out? 16. What made Felicity so tearful and unhappy?

VII. Give a summary of chapters XI-ХIV.

VIII. Write a one-page precis of chapters XI-ХIV.

Chapters XV-XVII

I. Translate into Russian a passage on p. 157 ("They moved from picture ... would have told him."), and a passage on pp. 158-159 ("It was the following day ... by all kinds of absurdities.").

II. Find in the text English equivalents for the following words and phrases. Learn them and use them when giving a summary:

кошмар; уговорить; портретная живопись; черновик; что случилось; держаться за провод громоотвода; чудо; само по себе; непосредственная опасность; неохотно; исключать (из учебного заведения); тревога, волнение, забота; маловероятно; предатель, изменник

III. Explain what is meant by:

1. The world around him seemed to have become equally mad and hateful. (p. 151) 2. He wanted to be the new person thai she made of him, the free and creative and joyful and loving person ... (p. 155) 3. My father was such a powerful painter, and such a strong personality, I was practically made in his image. (p. 156) 4. Mr. Bledyard would not have criticized that. (p. 156) 5. ... it occurred to him for the first time that his general attitude to this person was one of hostility. (p. 157) 6. As far as the exam was concerned Nan was obviously more glad than otherwise that Don would miss it. (p. 175) 7. ... especially if the latter arrived to fetch him in the latest Bentley or the oldest Rolls. (p. 177) 8. Meanwhile, it was he who was to be pitied, he who had to act the murderer and the traitor. (p. 181)

IV. Comment on what the characters say or think

1. He realized, with a spasm of pain, that in order to come to his beloved he would have to summon up not his good qualities but his bad ones: his anger, his hatred of Nan, his capacity for sheer irresponsible violence. (p. 152) 2. At this thought Mor felt a mixture of attraction and revulsion. (p. 154) 3. ... he roughly sketched a letter to Tim Burke explaining briefly that after all he would not be able to stand as a Labour candidate. (p. 158) 4. He knew that she would be very surprised. She would hardly be able to imagine that he would turn against her decisively at last. (p. 159) 5. "Why do painters represent in pictures the faces of their fellow men? To this it may be answered that painters represent things that are to be found in the world, and human

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faces are things that are to be found in the world," (p. 162) 6. But Nan, as if once more to cross him, had been since her return enormously calm, reasonable, and compliant, doing her best to generate once more that atmosphere of homely ennui which Mor could still remember that he had once found reassuring. (p. 175) 7. Inside all his happiness this pain would remain always intact until his life's end. (p. 181)

V. Say what expressive means the author used and comment on their stylistic value:

1. It the first sight of London, always for him, as in his country childhood, the beautiful and slightly sinister city of possibilities and promises. (p. 153) 2. He spoke throughout with total solemnity and with the slow deliberation of one announcing a declaration of war or the death of royalty. (p. 162) 3. He stoo4 for a moment, staring about the room, his feet spread wide apart upon the sea of books. (p. 173) 4. Like a pack of hounds, the other boys began to stream after him ... (p. 174) 5. He felt as if he were talking to someone who was already dead, but who didn't yet know it. (p. 176)

VI. Answer the following questions and motivate your answers:

1. Why did everything around him look equally mad and hateful? 2. What prevented Mor from becoming Rain's lover? 3. Why did Mor feel intimidated when he felt himself for the first time in Rain's world when he was brought to the exhibition 'of works of the Carters, father and daughter? 4. What miraculous thing did Rain strike out of his dullness as it seemed to Mor? 5. V/hy was Mor's attitude to Rain's father so much like hostility? 6. Why did Mor give up his ambition to become an M. P. as he wrote to Tim Burke, and what did it mean? 7. What made Mor delay his letter to Nan until after Don's exam? 8. Why did Donald and Cardy make an attempt to climb the tower? Whose idea was it? 9. What were the results of that climbing? 10. What kind of behaviour did Nan choose to bring Mor back under her influence? 11. Why did Mor think that it was he and not Rain who was to be pitied? 12. What pain did he feel inside his happiness?

VII. Give a summary of chapters XV-XVII.

VIII. Write a one-page precis; of chapters XV-XVII.

Chapters XVIII-XX

I. Translate into Russian a passage on pp. 187-188 ("Demoyte rose to his feet ... then after a suitable interval looked at Nan."), and a passage on pp. 189-190 ("Ladles and gentlemen," said Nan ... Mor shook his head violently.").

II. Find in the text English equivalents for the following words and phrases. Learn them and use when giving a summary:

успокоиться; представлять себе (рисовать в воображении); вызвать сенсацию; наблюдать (за вновь прибывшими); одобрять; осуществить (честолюбивое) стремление всей жизни; убедить; спешить не было смысла; на первый взгляд; (не) сердиться на

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III. Explain what is meant by:

1. The future in which Nan would enjoy the benefit of her daring did not belong to him. (p. 183) 2. "Our great democracy has not looked towards St. Bride's in vain - and public servants in all ranks of honourable employment are numbered among our old boys." (p. 189) 3. Nan had attempted to corner him by a public gesture. (p. 191) 4. "I had just not realized that I was wrecking your whole life." (p. 195) 5. "You are a growing tree. I am only a bird." (p. 195) 6. ". ... if you let her cheat you out of that too, I'll never receive you in this house again." (p. 202)

IV. Comment on what the characters say or think:

1. ... it had been decided that only senior masters were to be invited ... (p. 181) 2. "What I hate," said Prewett, "is to see Evvy crawling to those swine. He doesn't seem to realize he's worth ten of each of them." (p. 183) 3. A lifetime of conformity was too much for him. (p. 191) 4. The scene held him prisoner, his wife's presence and her words pinned him to his chair, his whole previous life contained him like a strait-jacket. (p. 192) 5. "If we were together my work would continue. But what about yours?" (p. 195) 6. "But a 1'ife has so much more in it than that." (p. 196) 7. "You have made your own future." (p. 201) 8. " ... we've each of us received a picture of ourselves." (p. 202)

V. Say what expressive means the author used and comment on their stylistic value:

1. He wore his evening dress like a soldier, and confronted his foes with the familiar front, as shameless as brass and as hard as steel. (p. 184) 2. "Under whose able and inspiring leadership," Evvy was saying, "St. Bridge rose from the deplorable slough in which it formerly lay, and became, dare we say it, a sound and reputable public school of the second class." (p. 186) 3. The scene held him prisoner, his wife's presence and her words pinned him to his chair, his whole previous life contained him like a strait-jacket. (p. 192) 4. "You are a growing tree. I am only a bird. You cannot break your roots and fly away with me." (p. 195) 5. "It's all dry sand running through the fingers." (p. 195)

VI. Answer the following questions and motivate your answers:

1. Why did Mor feel extremely nervous at the dinner party? Did he expect any trick on Nan's part? 2. How did Evvy try to make amends with Sir Leopold's rudeness to Demoyte? 3. What was it about Demoyte that had faded the look of condescension the Governors had been wearing all the evening and made them no longer feel themselves to be conferring, by their presence, a favour upon a bunch of simple-minded provincial schoolmasters? 4. Why did Nan make Mor's ambition to become an M. P. a public knowledge? 5. Why did Mor remain speechless and bound to his seat? 6. Who do you think suffered greater - Mor or Rain? 7. Do you think Mor and Rain could be happy if they were together? 8. Was Demoyte right when he said that Alor had made his own future? 9. Did Rain really see Demoyte and Mor as they were? 10. Why did Nan sob, now that everything had been settled?

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VII. Give a summary of chapters XVIII-XX.

VIII. Write a one-page precis of chapters XVIII-XX.

Suggested Topics for Discussion

1. Iris Murdoch, her background, her life and literary career.

2. A character sketch of:

a) William Mor (his appearance, his attitude towards his wife and children, his attitude towards his work and his ambition, his love for Даш, his moral qualities, his attitude towards his friends). Suggestion: consult the following pages: 6, 7, 8, 11, 12, 22, 27, 31, 41, 62, 71, 77, 78, 80, 84, 86, 87, 103, 105, 106, 107, 111, 115, 116, 124, 137, 140, 141, 142, 143, 151, 152, 158, 159, 173, 175, 179, 182, 183, 191, .194, 195, 196, 201, 202.

b) Nan (her appearance, her attitude towards her husband and children, her views on married life, her moral qualities). Suggestion: consult the following pages: 7, 8, 9, 10, 15, 20, 40, 61, 104, 127-130, 132, 135, 137, 139, 141, 148, 149, 175, 183, 188, 190, 191, 202.

c) Rain (her appearance, her art, her love for Mor, her moral qualities). Suggestion: consult the following pages: 7, 8, 19, 18, 19, 34, 37, 38, 53, 57, 60, 73, 74, 76, 81, 124, 154, 155, 179, 184, 194, 195, 196, 201.

d) Demoyte (his appearance, his attitude towards Mor, his attitude towards Rain, his attitude towards his former colleagues, his inner qualities). Suggestion: consult the following pages: 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 19, 22, 74, 80, 84, 119, 184, 187, 188, 202.

e) Bledyard (his appearance, his peculiarities, his views on art, his role in the book). Suggestion: consult the following pages: 21, 37, 55, .56, 60, 109, 119, 144, 146, 147, 158, 161, 162.

f) Tim Burke (his character, his attitude towards Mor, his attitude towards Nan). Suggestion: consult the following pages: 11, 42, 43, 44-49, 72, 116, 134, 205.

3. St. Bride's, a reputable public school of the second class, its teaching staff, its Governors, its "old boys", its traditions, etc.

4. The style and composition of the novel.

5. Explain the title of the story.

6. The problems raised in the book and the way the author treats them.

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1 Iris Murdoch. "The Sandcastle", Л., 1975. 354


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