EXERCISES IN INTONATION

SECTION ONE

Review of Part Two1

EXERCISES

Simple Tunes

I.2 This exercise is meant to review Intonation Patterns IX and XII. Listen carefully to the following sentences. Mark the stresses and tunes. Listen to the sentences again. Pronounce the unstressed syllables of the pre-head as low as possible. Make the stressed and the unstressed syllables of the head carry the pitch lower, until you come to the last stressed syllable of all, which starts very high and falls right down to the bottom of the voice. Any syllables after the last stressed syllable are said on a very low note. Do not forget to blend the words together. Give a conversational context with the same sentences. Say what attitudes you mean to render.

Intonation Pattern IX:

(LOW PRE-HEAD+) HIGH FALL ( + TAIL)

Intonation Pattern XII:

(LOW PRE-HEAD + ) HIGH HEAD + HIGH FALL ( + TAIL)

250

Move.
I did.
They can.
Try to.
That side.
This time.
I'm in it.
Borrow one.
John took it.
Wait for them.
That was it.
I'll see.
They shall.
You aren't.
We're wet.
You must tell me.
We could trace it.
It was all here.
This is the best.
It isn't steady.
I'm not wanted.

  • I think you'd better ask the others.
  • Henry said he'd wait for us at home.
  • What time do you generally have breakfast?
  • I was held up at the last moment.
  • Which of Shakespeare's plays d'you like best?

2. This exercise is meant to review Intonation Pattern XIII. Listen carefully to the following sentences. Mark the stresses and tunes. Listen to the sentences again. Pronounce the stressed and the unstressed syllables of the high head on the same rather high pitch. The very last stressed syllable starts from a medium to a high pitch. Do not forget to blend the words together. Give a conversational context with the same sentences. Say what attitudes you mean to render.

Intonation Pattern XIII

(LOW PRE-HEAD + ) (HIGH HEAD + ) HIGH RISE

Always?
Can't you?
May I?
This time?
Doesn't it?
Are we to?
Haven't they?
Will they be?
Which is it?
Won't it be done?
Are you the one?
What did you say?
Will it do?
Can I start?
Is it brown?
Were they mixed?
Are they as good?
Will they be there?
Were they enough?
Were you in time?
Can she do this?
Couldn't she stay?
Is it all here?
Did John like it?

251

Will she be there?
Have you seen it?
Which did he take?
Is it wanted?
Will you wait?

  • Is that the man who sent you tickets?
  • Hasnt't John given Mary the paper?
  • Can you tell me the shortest way to the station?
  • Aren't you going to take the children to school?
  • Are you quite sure I'm not bothering you?

3. This exercise is meant to review Intonation Patterns I, III, IX, XII. Read the following sentences with the Low Fall, making your voice fall from a medium to a very low pitch; with the High Pall, making your voice fall from a high to a very low pitch; with the Low Rise, making your voice rise from a low to a medium pitch; with the High Rise, making your voice rise from a medium to a high pitch. Use them in conversational situations. Observe the difference in attitudes.

Model: Always. Always. Always. Always.


I can admit her. Who can resist it?
I do mean that. How can you accept this answer?
He's a decent fellow. Refuse it.
He thought so. Be frank with us.

4.* This exercise is meant to develop your ability to hear and reproduce intonation in proper speech situations. Listen to the following dialogue. Write it down. Mark the stresses and tunes. Practise the dialogue. Find sentences with the High Fall and the High Rise. Observe the attitudes they convey. Record your reading. Play the recording back immediately for your teacher and fellow-students to detect the errors in your pronunciation. Practise reading each sentence of your corrected variant after the tape-recorder. Practise reading the dialogue with a fellow-student. Make up a conversation with a fellow-student using any phrases from the dialogue. See that your Russian pronunciation habits do not interfere.

A Letter of Introduction

Short. Mr. Wills?

Wills. Yes.

Short. My name's Short, from Malaya. J. R. Smith told me to come and see you. I believe he's written to you.

Wills. Yes, I heard from him - when was it? About a month ago, I suppose. He said you'd be coming along, but he didn't say when. Have you just arrived?

Short. On Monday. I rang you up yesterday, but there wasn't anyone who knew when you'd be in. I had to be passing this morning in any case, so I thought I'd look in and ask if there was any chance of finding you.

Wills. Well now, I'd love to have a chat with you, but it's a bit awkward this morning. The trouble is, I've got a man coming to see me in a few minutes, and I don't know just how long the business'll take. Otherwise I'd have suggested your having lunch with me. But I just don't know when I shall be free.

252

Short. Oh please don't bother. I hate to worry you, but if you could spare me a little time some other day ...

Wills. Well, what could we do, I wonder. Are you staying in town for the moment?

Short. About ten days. Till Monday week in fact.

Wills. Let's see. To-day's Thursday, and I shall be going out of town next Wednesday. What about Monday? Is that any use to you, or have you got other things on?

Short. Could you make it the afternoon? I've already made an appointment for the morning. I might be able to change it - if I could let you know this afternoon.

Wills. No, no; that's all right. We'll make it Monday afternoon. What shall we say - half-past two?

Short. Yes, that'll be fine. Thanks very much.

Wills. Good. I'm sorry to have to push you out like this now, but we'll have our talk on Monday. See you then.

5.* This exercise is meant toreview Intonation Patterns VI and VII. Listen to the following sentences. Mark the stresses and tunes. Listen to the sentences again, and repeat them in the intervals. Pronounce each group of sentences several times so as to accustom yourself to the various intonation patterns. Do not forget to blend the words together smoothly. In order to improve your ability to control the ups and downs of your voice, to hear and produce an intonation pattern record the groups of sentences, play the recording back. The fellow-students will try to detect any failure to reproduce the pattern. Give a conversational context with the same sentences. Say what attitudes you mean to render. Make a dialogue of your own.

Intonation Pattern VI

FALL-RISE

Intonation
Pattern III
Intonation
Pattern IX
Intonation
Pattern V
LOW RISE HIGH FALL FALL-RISE ONLY
Model: No. Model: No. Model: ˇNo.
High. High. High.
Long. Long. Long.

253

Both. Both. Both.
Move. Move. Move.
Hope. Hope. Hope.
Knock. Knock. Knock.


LOW RISE + TAIL HIGH FALL + TAIL FALL - RISE
    (spread over two syllables)
Model: This one. Model: This one. Model: This one.
They can. They can. They can.
This side. This side. This side.
This time. This time. This time.
Try to. Try to. Try to.
Take it. Take it. Take it.
Tell me. Tell me. Tell me.
LOW RISE + TAIL HIGH FALL - TAIL FALL - RISE
(of more than one syllable) (of more than one syllable) (spread over a number syllables)
Model: None of them. Model: None of them. Model: None of them.
That was it. That was it. That was it.
They were in it. They were in it. They were in it.
These'll be good. These'll be good. These'll be good.
You could do it. You could do it. You could do it.
That isn't it. That isn't it. That isn't it.
Borrow one. Borrow one. Borrow one.
Wait for them. Wait for them. Wait for them.
Keep it for us. Keep it for us. Keep it for us.
LOW PRE-HEAD + LOW RISE LOW PRE-HEAD + HIGH FALL LOW PRE-HEAD + FALL-RISE
Model: I'll see. Model: I'll see. Model: I'll ˇsee.
They shall. They shall. They shall.
You aren't. You aren't. You aren't.
We were wet. We were wet. We were wet.
They may have. They may have. They may have.
She could hear. She could hear. She could hear.
They were eight. They were eight. They were eight.
I can start. I can start. I can start.
They were mixed. They were mixed. They were mixed.
We were in time. We were in time. We were in time.
They understood. They understood. They understood.
You were asleep. You were asleep. You were asleep.
It was the best. It was the best. It was the best.
Take them to-day. Take them to-day. Take them to-day.

254

Intonation Pattern VII

(LOW PRE-HEAD + FALLING HEAD + FALL-RISE

  • She never really looks very well.
  • I wish we could get them all to agree.
  • It's easier to speak than to understand.
  • I should like you to take the class to-morrow.
  • You can't be sure of finding them in the office.
  • I think most of the trains used to stop at Exeter.
  • It doesn't do to be too eager about it.
  • You surely don't believe everything you hear.
  • We didn't know the whole family was there.
  • They won't arrive before lunch to-morrow.

Compound Tunes

FALL + RISE

  • She ought to tell us when she's going to leave.
  • I used to be very fond of strawberries and cream.
  • We should have hated to have stayed any longer.
  • It would have been much better to peel them.
  • You can certainly ask him to wait in the drawing-room.
  • It's easy to see he's not susceptible to flattery.
  • The librarian lent him the book.
  • I know you wouldn't be anxious to go.
  • Nobody wanted to stay there.

6. Read the following sentences with the Fall + Rise. In order to fix intonation of this compound tune in your mind, ear and speech habits read each sentence several times until they sound perfectly natural to you. Use them in conversational situations. Observe quick pronunciation of unstressed syllables. Concentrate your attention on Rhythm and Intonation. Say what attitudes you mean to render.

  • I want you to take the others.
  • Living in a big city has advantages.

255

  • She sang so well that the listeners were filled with admiration.
  • How can they be so indifferent to the sufferings of the child?
  • I'm sure they accepted the invitation with pleasure.
  • She pretends to be quite indifferent to what her friends said to her.
  • He was indignant with Tom for not telling him the truth.
  • I wish I could spare you the trouble of going there.
  • But we are confident of winning the first place in the competition.
  • She'll have an accident if she doesn't show more discretion when driving the car.
  • Spare me the trouble of reminding you of your promises.
  • I admit that the statement is true.
  • For me the picture has an irresistible charm.
  • I regard it as my duty to help them.
  • She is tired of your constant complaints.
  • I can hardly believe that my son will be admitted to screen the play.
  • I'm sorry you've had all this bother on my account.
  • You don't mean to say you'd forgotten it.
  • But I've already made an appointment'for the morning.

7.1 This exercise is meant to develop your ability to hear and reproduce intonation in proper speech situations. Listen to the dialogue. Mark the stresses and tunes. Practise the dialogue. Record your reading. Play the recording back immediately for your teacher and fellow-students to detect the errors in your pronunciation. Practise reading each sentence of your corrected variant after the tape-recorder. Find phrases pronounced with Fall - Rise or Fall + Rise- Say what attitudes are rendered by them. Make up conversational situations, using these sentences.

A. Did you see "Othello" on television last night?

B. The opera, you mean? No, I didn't. I was out.

A. I saw it, and quite enjoyed it.

B. Did you? I thought you didn't approve of television.

A. I don't as a regular thing, but I happened to be round at my sister's, and she wanted to see it, so I watched it too.

B. Have you thought any more about getting a set?

A. No, I don't think I shall. Though there's a good deal of pressure, of course.

B. From your family?

A. From my daughter in particular. All her school friends talk about it so much.

B. I'know. You'd think they never did anything else but sit glued to the television screen.

A That's mostly what I object to, the time it wastes. B. It isn't the television that wastes the time, it's you. A. I know that, but I have a deep distrust of myself. So it's probably better to avoid the occasion of sin. Don't you think?

8. Listen to the extract from "The Importance of Being Earnest" (see pp. 51-55). Read it. Find sentences containing more than one Fall. Use them in conversational situations.

256

9. Respond using the High Fall to emphasize delight, joy, pleasant surprise, approval, self-satisfaction. •

I'm going to Leningrad to-morrow. Fine! Marvellous! Now, aren't you lucky! Pretty good!
What a very nice garden! Simply wonderful! What a magnificent view!
I rather like Susan. Pretty, isn't she! Isn't she very bright!
You are invited to dub the film. Splendid! Smashing! Oh, good!
What did. you think of the show? Simply wonderful! Magnificent! Delightful! Quite perfect! First rate! Gripping!
Mary's getting better. What a delightful surprise! At last! Marvellous!
You've won the first prize! Pretty good! Now, isn't that peculiar! Yes, didn't it go well!
I've brought you some flowers. How kind of you! Thanks awfully! That is good of you!
I've finished my exams. Congratulations! Clever, aren't you! Quite the best thing you've ever done!

10. Respond using Intonation Patterns IX or X to emphasize hostility, anger, indignation, disgruntled protest.

I've lost my invitation card. Awful! When, for heaven's sake? Aren't you just the sort of person to drive me mad? How annoying!
He says it was your fault. The brute! Pretentious nonsense! What on earth are you getting at?
Harry's not coming to tea. Why! How annoying! What a bore he is! Isn't he silly? How can he be so obstinate?
Mary's put paint all over the cacrpet. Why did she do it? Isn't she just the sort of person to drive you mad? What a nuisance she is!
Isn't it cold to-day? What ghastly weather! Fearfully cold! Beastly!
I shan't stay a minute longer. How can you say such a stupid thing? What on earth are you getting at?

11. Respond using the Fall-Rise to express reproach, concern, regret, hurt feelings, reluctance and impatience.

He's broken a window. Nonsense! Rubbish! No wonder! Why can't he leave things alone! Isn't it just what you'd expect of him?
What an extraordinary hat! Isn't it a picture! Have you seen anything like that!
The key doesn't seem to work. No wonder! Now, what's the matter? Isn't it strange! Can I help at all?

257

  I should think so indeedl Why not! How very strange!
He's forgotten to shut the gate. Have you seen anything like that? It's much too late to have any regrets now. Well, he does amaze me! Isn't it just what you'd expect of him!
I think you are being very unfair. Nonsense! I should think so indeed! unfair. Not in the least! Oughtn't you be ashamed!
I think it's the best film of the year. Rubbish! Well, you do amaze me!
Frank refused the offer! Don't I know it! How very strange! Now, what's the matter?

12.* Listen to the following proverbs and sayings. Make sure you understand each sentence. Observe the peculiarities of intonation group division, pitch, stress and tempo. Underline the communicative centre and the nuclear word of each intonation group. Practise reading the proverbs and sayings. Make your reading expressive. Memorize them.

  • A man's as old as he feels and a woman's as old as she looks.
  • Sit in your place, and none can make you rise.
  • Who chatters to you will chatter of you.
  • If a man deceives me once, shame on him; if he deceives me twice, shame on me.
  • You can't eat your cake and have it.
  • He's a good physician who cures himself.
  • Two things a man should never be angry at: what he can help and what he can't help.
  • Better be ill spoken of by one before all than by all before one.
  • Young men think old men fools, and old men know young men to be so.

13. Make up a dialogue of your own to illustrate the proverbs and sayings given above. Use the High Fall, the High Rise, the Fall-Rise and the Fall + Rise in it.

258


1 For explanation and exercises see "Practical Course of English" (Second year). Ed. by Prof. V. D. Arakin, M., 1978.
2 Material for exercises marked with one asterisk is borrowed from the book by R. Kingdon "English Intonation Practice", L., 1960.
1 Material for exercises marked with two asterisks is borrowed from the book by J. D. O'Connor and Q. F. Arnold "Intonation of Colloquial English", L., 1961.


Купить BlueTooth гарнитуру

Яндекс цитирования Rambler's Top100
Tikva.Ru © 2006. All Rights Reserved